A Quick Look at the Hashtags in Jimmy Fallon’s Skit

Jimmy Fallon and Jonah Hill did a new skit called #Hashtag2 where they express themselves with hashtags on Twitter. If you haven’t seen it, go take two minutes. I’ll wait.

Screen Shot 2014-02-21 at 11.15.37 AM

After seeing this, I was curious if people actually used these hashtags in real life. Are we all really #blessed and #winning? It appears so. There were 784,207 uses of #blessed and 420,696 uses of #winning in the last 30 days on Twitter. But not many of us are living #livinlavidaloca with 580 uses. Maybe we’re not #livinlavidaloca because there have been only 83 mentions of #sippinonginandjuice.

Below are two charts that show real-world usage of the hashtags included in the video’s script. It’s rather amusing to see how prevalent (or not) they themes are in our daily lives!

ChartofHashtagsfromJimmyFallon

HashtagsInJimmyFallonsVideo

 

Twitter Certified Partners and International Expansion

An interview with Conway Chen and Zach Hofer-Shall of Twitter on Twitter Certified Partners and International Expansion.

Zach Hofer Shall and Conway Chen of Twitter

As Chris Moody sat down with Conway Chen and Zach Hofer-Shall of Twitter this morning, the conversation began with shared optimism on increased talk about Twitter data. All panelists were quick to praise the recent conversation of Twitter CEO Dick Costello on All Things D, where the Twitter data stream was the star of the conversation.

Conway explained this emerging interest in data with an anecdote around Twitter’s early expectations when opening the data stream- expectations that were little to none. Instead, it is the innovation built using the data that is making Twitter infinitely more valuable.

Twitter Data Is Special

4 things set Twitter data apart:

1. It is real time

2. It is public

3. It is conversational, people aren’t just speaking into the ether the conversation goes both ways

4. It is distributed

Honor Thy User

It is a delicate balance to simultaneously respect users creating the data while also wanting to get data out there and ensure it is monetizable. Zach is quick to mention strict adherence and support of a Twitter core values: Defend and respect the users voice. He continues by stating that if this goes wrong, the whole system falls apart.

Twitter has mindfully created a structure that honors this, a key component of which is data resellers. Data resellers enable Twitter to maintain values and still be able to scale. These partnerships have allowed Twitter to encourage and foster innovation in ways they would not have been able to.

Sustainability and Long-term Growth

Conway- we are absolutely committed to the success of Twitter data and the ecosystem around it. Continuing to look at is the data we are pushing out correct? Is the way we are pushing out helping resellers and developers to innovate and build on it? Twitter data and the strategy around Twitter data is pivotal in how Twitter sees their growth.

Data is a core part of the business that wasn’t always seen as a core part of the business. We are so invested in the success of Twitter data long term that we are committed to seeing it scale. And a key part of that is improving efficiency.

There is an understanding now that Twitter data is important- this speaks volume to the sustainability of the system. People don’t need a sell on the access to the data, they are instead interested in how resellers can make that data useful to them.

Twitter Certified Partner Program

Zach defines the Twitter Certified Partner Program as the answer to skeptics that Twitter doesn’t like their ecosystem. The program was established to help the ecosystem grow, help them succeed and grant providers their seal of approval.

The program ultimately acts as a tool to empower innovation on the Twitter stream. Twitter does not have the capacity to create these tools and resources independently. Less than a year old, the program has been adding 5 to 10 strategic companies each quarter. Factors when selecting certified partners include innovative uses of the data (beyond analytics and engagement) and strategic international partnerships.

Certified partners benefit from instant credibility provided through membership in the program when talking to investors and customers, access to prioritized developer support and promotion from the Twitter sales team. Twitter sales team members are trained and knowledgeable of certified partner products. As the team sells promoted content, they are also able to suggest and recommend partners to fill needs Twitter cannot.

International Growth: Not Just Language Localization

Conway identifies two areas of growth that are current bright spots: Europe and Japan. In identifying new markets, Twitter is looking for existing ecosystems where then can bolster and support what’s already happening. Brazil, Japan, South Korea and India are four regions appealing to Twitter now.

Localization isn’t just localization in terms of language, there is localization of analytics and data types as well.

International tools looking to join the Twitter Certified Partner Program need to match the same high standards of other partners. Twitter works with products in new markets to bring them to their standards.

Advertising

Conway calls for service providers to develop tools to empower advertisers to move to ROI driven decisions. He encourages developers to focus on tools to provide actionable insights to inform ad-spend.

The Future of Twitter Data

In a word: Media. In the last year Twitter has blossomed beyond the 140 to the media hung off those characters. Innovation in the data will include tapping into what is attached to the Tweet. Not just the Tweet itself.

GeoData

Self-defining as a mobile-first company, Conway identifies explaining why geodata remains so low as one of his biggest pain points. The balance to respect user’s privacy first while acknowledging delivering a better consumer experience depends on the inclusion of geodata. Ultimately, Conway categorizes it as a product side problem: to get users to opt-in to share their data.

Big Boulder is the world’s first social data conference. Follow along at #BigBoulder, on the blog under Big BoulderBig Boulder on Storify and on Gnip’s Facebook page.

Social Data vs Social Media

One area I see a lot of confusion about is the difference between social media vs. social data. I come from a social media background and use social media in marketing, so I see where the confusion can come from.

The easiest way to think about it in plain English:

  • Social Media: User-generated content where one user communicates and expresses themselves and that content is delivered to other users. Examples of this are platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr and Disqus. Social media is delivered in a great user experience, and is focused on sharing and content discovery. Social media also offers both public and private experiences with the ability to share messages privately.

  • Social Data: Expresses social media in a computer-readable format (e.g. JSON) and shares metadata about the content to help provide not only content, but context. Metadata often includes information about location, engagement and links shared. Unlike social media, social data is focused strictly on publicly shared experiences.

Or otherwise boiled down, social media is readable by humans and made for human interaction while social data is social media that is readable by computers.

Let’s look at a Tweet in form of social media and social data to show exactly what I’m talking about.

From this Tweet from Gnip, we can visually see that it uses the #BigBoulder hashtag, a Bit.ly link to our Storify page, that it has 73 retweets and 3 favorites, the time and date of the Tweet.  

 

Now let’s take a look at what the architecture of a Tweet looks like when received from an API.

 

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{
   "body": "RT @gnip: Thrilled to welcome all #BigBoulder attendees! Watch the social
story unfold on our Storify page. http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
   "retweetCount": 71,
   "generator": {
      "link": "http://twitter.com",
      "displayName": "web"
   },
   "gnip": {
      "klout_score": 53,
      "matching_rules": [
         {
            "tag": "old krusty tweet",
            "value": "thrilled to welcome all attendees"
         }
      ],
      "language": {
         "value": "en"
      },
      "urls": [
         {
            "url": "http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
            "expanded_url": "http://storify.com/Gnip/big-boulder"
         }
      ]
   },
   "object": {
      "body": "Thrilled to welcome all #BigBoulder attendees! Watch the social
story unfold on our Storify page. http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
       "generator": {
         "link": "http://www.tweetdeck.com",
         "displayName": "TweetDeck"
      },
      "object": {
         "postedTime": "2012-06-20T18:07:13.000Z",
         "summary": "Thrilled to welcome all #BigBoulder attendees! Watch the social
story unfold on our Storify page. http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
      "link": "http://twitter.com/gnip/statuses/215506104082366465",
         "id": "object:search.twitter.com,2005:215506104082366465",
         "objectType": "note"
      },
      "actor": {
         "preferredUsername": "gnip",
         "displayName": "Gnip, Inc.",
         "links": [
            {
               "href": "http://gnip.com",
               "rel": "me"
            }
         ],
         "twitterTimeZone": "Mountain Time (US & Canada)",
         "image": "http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/1347133706/
Gnip_logo-73x73_normal.png",
         "verified": true,
         "location": {
            "displayName": "Boulder, CO",
            "objectType": "place"
         },
         "statusesCount": 971,
         "summary": "Gnip is the leading provider of social media data for enterprise
applications, facilitating access to dozens of social media sources through a single
API",
         "languages": [
            "en"
         ],
         "utcOffset": "-25200",
         "link": "http://www.twitter.com/gnip",
         "followersCount": 3335,
         "favoritesCount": 108,
         "friendsCount": 384,
         "listedCount": 212,
         "postedTime": "2008-10-24T23:22:09.000Z",
         "id": "id:twitter.com:16958875",
         "objectType": "person"
      },
      "twitter_entities": {
         "user_mentions": [],
         "hashtags": [
            {
               "indices": [
                  24,
                  35
               ],
               "text": "BigBoulder"
            }
         ],
         "urls": [
            {
               "indices": [
                  98,
                  118
               ],
               "url": "http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
               "expanded_url": "http://bit.ly/MumrVJ",
               "display_url": "bit.ly/MumrVJ"
            }
         ]
      },
      "verb": "post",
      "link": "http://twitter.com/gnip/statuses/215506104082366465",
      "provider": {
         "link": "http://www.twitter.com",
         "displayName": "Twitter",
         "objectType": "service"
      },
      "postedTime": "2012-06-20T18:07:13.000Z",
      "id": "tag:search.twitter.com,2005:215506104082366465",
      "objectType": "activity"
   },
   "actor": {
      "preferredUsername": "daveheal",
      "displayName": "Dave Heal",
      "links": [
         {
            "href": "http://daveheal.com",
            "rel": "me"
         }
      ],
      "twitterTimeZone": "Mountain Time (US & Canada)",
      "image": "http://a0.twimg.com/profile_images/1755125722/photo_2_normal.JPG",
      "verified": false,
      "location": {
         "displayName": "Boulder, CO",
         "objectType": "place"
      },
      "statusesCount": 5657,
      "summary": "Boulder resident. Rochester NY native. Michigan Law graduate.
Copyright enthusiast. Liker of sports. DFW fanboy. CrossFitter. Work @Gnip. ",
      "languages": [
         "en"
      ],
      "utcOffset": "-25200",
      "link": "http://www.twitter.com/daveheal",
      "followersCount": 671,
      "favoritesCount": 28,
      "friendsCount": 292,
      "listedCount": 26,
      "postedTime": "2009-03-02T01:18:39.000Z",
      "id": "id:twitter.com:22432819",
      "objectType": "person"
   },
   "twitter_entities": {
      "user_mentions": [
         {
            "indices": [
               3,
               8
            ],
            "id": 16958875,
            "screen_name": "gnip",
            "id_str": "16958875",
            "name": "Gnip, Inc."
         }
      ],
      "hashtags": [
         {
            "indices": [
               34,
               45
            ],
            "text": "BigBoulder"
         }
      ],
      "urls": [
         {
            "indices": [
               108,
               128
            ],
            "url": "http://t.co/ZzqUMfJz",
            "expanded_url": "http://bit.ly/MumrVJ",
            "display_url": "bit.ly/MumrVJ"
         }
      ]
   },
   "verb": "share",
   "link": "http://twitter.com/daveheal/statuses/215509188481253376",
   "provider": {
      "link": "http://www.twitter.com",
      "displayName": "Twitter",
      "objectType": "service"
   },
   "postedTime": "2012-06-20T18:19:29.000Z",
   "id": "tag:search.twitter.com,2005:215509188481253376",
   "objectType": "activity"
}

This is social data. Same content, very different format, very different context and very different end user.

So what exactly does goes into the social data of a Tweet? To start, here is some of the metadata that you’re seeing.

  • Language identification — It is detected that the language of this Tweet is in English. Language identification is important for social media monitoring so companies can correctly monitor for the content they want.

  • URL expansion — Essentially this resolves or traces a shortened url to the end url that a consumer would see in their browser window. In this case, http://storify.com/Gnip/big-boulder is the link we shared using bitly.

  • Content — Gnip shows the full content of the Tweeted message, as well as metadata about the Tweet; like hashtags and URLs used, users that were mentioned, and when it was posted.

  • User — Gnip provides the display name, username, user’s stated location and additional bio information of the Tweeter. This is the information that users decide to share when signing up for an account.

  • Klout scores — An additional piece of metadata Gnip can provide is Klout score, so if one of our clients only wanted to see tweets with a Klout score of 30 or higher, they could do that.

Beyond Twitter data, Gnip offers social data from Tumblr, Disqus, Automattic (WordPress) and other publishers that all have their own unique metadata and enrichments. In addition to enrichments, Gnip offers format normalization. This means if you’re looking at a WordPress blog or a Tweet, the data is normalized no matter what the platform. E.g. date and location are formated and located in the same place within the JSON payload; making it easy to consume and parse data from multiple different sources.

Finally, a big difference is in how people use social data vs social media. Social data is what powers social media monitoring and analytics companies, it’s used in business intelligence to combine with other data sets, it’s used by hedge funds as part of their algorithms when looking at financial trades, or even to take a top-level look during a natural disaster.