Guide to the Twitter API – Part 2 of 3: An Overview of Twitter’s Search API

The Twitter Search API can theoretically provide full coverage of ongoing streams of Tweets. That means it can, in theory, deliver 100% of Tweets that match the search terms you specify almost in realtime. But in reality, the Search API is not intended and does not fully support the repeated constant searches that would be required to deliver 100% coverage.Twitter has indicated that the Search API is primarily intended to help end users surface interesting and relevant Tweets that are happening now. Since the Search API is a polling-based API, the rate limits that Twitter has in place impact the ability to get full coverage streams for monitoring and analytics use cases.  To get data from the Search API, your system may repeatedly ask Twitter’s servers for the most recent results that match one of your search queries. On each request, Twitter returns a limited number of results to the request (for example “latest 100 Tweets”). If there have been more than 100 Tweets created about a search query since the last time you sent the request, some of the matching Tweets will be lost.

So . . . can you just make requests for results more frequently? Well, yes, you can, but the total number or requests you’re allowed to make per unit time is constrained by Twitter’s rate limits. Some queries are so popular (hello “Justin Bieber”) that it can be impossible to make enough requests to Twitter for that query alone to keep up with this stream.  And this is only the beginning of the problem as no monitoring or analytics vendor is interested in just one term; many have hundreds to thousands of brands or products to monitor.

Let’s consider a couple examples to clarify.  First, say you want all Tweets mentioning “Coca Cola” and only that one term. There might be fewer than 100 matching Tweets per second usually — but if there’s a spike (say that term becomes a trending topic after a Super Bowl commercial), then there will likely be more than 100 per second. If because of Twitter’s rate limits, you’re only allowed to send one request per second, you will have missed some of the Tweets generated at the most critical moment of all.

Now, let’s be realistic: you’re probably not tracking just one term. Most of our customers are interested in tracking somewhere between dozens and hundreds of thousands of terms. If you add 999 more terms to your list, then you’ll only be checking for Tweets matching “Coca Cola” once every 1,000 seconds. And in 1,000 seconds, there could easily be more than 100 Tweets mentioning your keyword, even on an average day. (Keep in mind that there are over a billion Tweets per week nowadays.) So, in this scenario, you could easily miss Tweets if you’re using the Twitter Search API. It’s also worth bearing in mind that the Tweets you do receive won’t arrive in realtime because you’re only querying for the Tweets every 1,000 seconds.

Because of these issues related to the monitoring use cases, data collection strategies relying exclusively on the Search API will frequently deliver poor coverage of Twitter data. Also, be forewarned, if you are working with a monitoring or analytics vendor who claims full Twitter coverage but is using the Search API exclusively, you’re being misled.

Although coverage is not complete, one great thing about the Twitter Search API is the complex operator capabilities it supports, such as Boolean queries and geo filtering. Although the coverage is limited, some people opt to use the Search API to collect a sampling of Tweets that match their search terms because it supports Boolean operators and geo parameters. Because these filtering features have been so well liked, Gnip has replicated many of them in our own premium Twitter API (made even more powerful by the full coverage and unique data enrichments we offer).

So, to recap, the Twitter Search API offers great operator support but you should know that you’ll generally only see a portion of the total Tweets that match your keywords and your data might arrive with some delay. To simplify access to the Twitter Search API, consider trying out Gnip’s Enterprise Data Collector; our “Keyword Notices” feed retrieves, normalizes, and deduplicates data delivered through the Search API. We can also stream it to you so you don’t have to poll for your results. (“Gnip” reverses the “ping,” get it?)

But the only way to ensure you receive full coverage of Tweets that match your filtering criteria is to work with a premium data provider (like us! blush…) for full coverage Twitter firehose filtering. (See our Power Track feed if you’d like for more info on that.)

Stay tuned for Part 3, our overview of Twitter’s Streaming API coming next week…

Announcing Power Track – Full Firehose filtering for the Tweets you want

The response to the commercial Twitter streams we’ve made available has been outstanding. We’ve talked to hundreds of companies who are building growing businesses that analyze conversations on Twitter and other social media sites. As Twitter’s firehose continues to grow (now over 110 million Tweets per day), we’re hearing more and more requests for a way to filter the firehose down to the Tweets that matter.

Today, we’re announcing a new commercial Twitter product called Power Track. This is a keyword based filter of the full firehose that provides 100% coverage over a stream that you define. Power Track customers no longer have to deal with polling rate limits on the Search API and volume limits on the Streaming API.

In addition to keyword based filters, Power Track also supports boolean operators and many of the custom operators allowed on Twitter Search API. With Power Track, companies and developers can define the precise slice of the Twitter stream they need and be confident they’re getting every Tweet, without worrying about volume restrictions.

Currently we support operators for narrowing the stream to a set of users, matching against unwound URLs, filtering by location, and more. We’ll continue to add support for more ways for our customers to filter the content relevant to them in the future. Check the documentation to see the technical details of these operators and more.

Gnip is here to ensure the enterprise marketplace gets the depth, breadth, and reliability of social media data it requires. Please contact us at info@gnip.com to find out more.

Our Poem for Mountain.rb

Hello and Greetings, Our Ruby Dev Friends,
Mountain.rb we were pleased to attend.

Perhaps we did meet you! Perhaps we did not.
We hope, either way, you’ll give our tools a shot.

What do we do? Manage API feeds.
We fight the rate limits, dedupe all those tweets.

Need to know where those bit.ly’s point to?
Want to choose polling or streaming, do you?

We do those things, and on top of all that,
We put all your results in just one format.

You write only one parser for all of our feeds.
(We’ve got over 100 to meet your needs.)

The Facebook, The Twitter, The YouTube and More
If mass data collection makes your head sore…

Do not curse publishers, don’t make a fuss.
Just go to the Internet and visit us.

We’re not the best poets. Data’s more our thing.
So when you face APIs… give us a ring.

Hidden Engineering Gotchas Behind Polling

I just spent a couple of days optimizing a customer’s data collection on a Gnip instance, for a specific social media data source API. It had been awhile since I’d done this level of tuning, and it reminded me of just how many variables must be considered when optimally polling source API for data.

Requests Per Second (RPS) Limits

Most services have a rate limit that an given IP address (or API key/login) cannot break. If you hit an endpoint too hard, the API backs you off and/or blocks you. Don’t confuse RPS with concurrent connections however; they’re measured differently and each has its own limitations for a given API. In this particular case I was able to parallelize three requests because the total response time per request was ~3 seconds. The result was that a given IP address was not violating the API’s RPS limitations. Had the API been measuring concurrent connections, that would have been a different story.

Document/Page/Result-set Size

Impacting my ability to parallelize my requests was the document size I was requesting of the API. Smaller document sizes (e.g. 10 activities instead of 1000) meant faster response times, which when parallelized, run the risk of violating the RPS limits. On the other hand, larger document sizes take more time to get; whether because they’re simply bigger and take longer to transfer over the wire, or because the API you’re accessing is taking a long time to assemble the document on the backend.

Cycle Time

The particular API I was working with was a “keyword” based API, meaning that I was polling for search terms/keywords. In Gnip parlance we call these “terms” or “keywords,” “rules” in order to generalize the terminology. A rule-set’s “cycle time” is how long it takes a Gnip Data Collector to poll for a given rule-set once. For example, if a rule-set size is 1,000, and the API’s RPS limit is 1, that rule-set’s cycle time would be 1,000 seconds; every 1k seconds, each rule in the set has been polled. Obviously, the cycle time would increase if the server took longer than a second to respond to each requests.

Skipping (missing data)

A given rule “skips” data during polling (meaning, you will miss data because you’re not covering enough ground) when one of the following conditions is true. ARU (activity update rate) is the rate at which activities/events occur on the given rule (e.g. the number of times per second someone uploads a picture with the tag “foo”)

  • ARU is greater than the RPS limit (RPS represented as 1/RPS) multiplied by the document size.
  • ARU is greater than the rule-set’s cycle time

In order to optimally collect the data you need, in a timely manner, you have to balance all of these variables, and adjust them based on the activity update rate for the rule-set you’re interested in. While the variables make for engaging engineering exercises, do you want to spend time sorting these out, or spend time working on the core business issues you’re trying to solve? Gnip provides visibility into these variables to ensure data is most effectively collected.

Expanding Gnip's Facebook Graph API Support

One of our most requested features has long been Facebook support. While customers have had beta access for awhile now, today we’re officially announcing support for several new Facebook Graph API feeds. As with the other feeds available through Gnip, Facebook data is available in Activity Streams format (as well as original if you so desire), and you can choose your own delivery method (polling, webhook POSTing, or streaming). Gnip integrates with Facebook on your behalf, in a fully transparent manner, in order to feed you the Facebook data you’ve been longing for.

As with most services, Facebook’s APIs are also in constant flux. Integrating with Gnip shields you from the ever shifting sands of service integration. You don’t have to worry about authentication implementation changes or delivery method shifts.

Use-case Highlight

Discovery is hard. If you’re monitoring a brand or keyword for popularity (positive or negative sentiment), it’s challenging to keep track of fan pages that crop up without notice. With Gnip, you can receive real-time notification when one of your search terms is found within a fan page. Discover when a community is forming around a given topic, product, or brand before others do.

We currently support the following endpoints, and will be adding more based on customer demand.

  • Keyword Search – Search over all public objects in the Facebook social graph.
  • Lookup Fan Pages by Keyword – Look up IDs for Fan Pages with titles containing your search terms.
  • Fan Page Feed (with or without comments) – Receive wall posts from a list of Facebook Fan Pages you define.
  • Fan Page Posts (by page owner, without comments) – Receive wall posts from a list of Facebook Fan Pages you define. Only shows wall posts made by the page owner.
  • Fan Page Photos (without comments) – Get photos for a list of Facebook Fan Pages.
  • Fan Page Info – Get information including fan count, mission, and products for a list of Fan Pages.

Give Facebook via Gnip a try (http://try.gnip.com), and let us know what you think info@gnip.com

Response Code Nuances

While fixing a bug yesterday, I plowed through the code that does Gnip’s HTTP response code special case handling. The scenarios we’re handling illustrate the complexities around doing integrations with many web APIs. It was a reminder of how much we all want standards to work, and how often they only partially do so. Here are a few nuances you should consider if you’re doing API integrations by hand.

“retry-after”

When doing a polling based integration with a “real-time” API, you’re inclined to poll it a lot. That has caused some service providers to tell you to slow down using the “retry-after” HTTP header. Some providers use other, not so standard, ways to cool you down, but those are beyond the scope of this post. When you get a non-200-level response back from a server, you should consider looking for the retry-after header, regardless of whether or not it was a 503 or 300-level code (per HTTP 1.1 specification). Generally, when a services sends a retry-after, they’re intention behind it is clear, and you should respect the value that comes back. Now, the format of that value can be either “seconds”, or in a more verbose time format that tells you when you should wait “until” before trying the request again. In practice, we’ve never seen the latter; only the “seconds” version. When we see retry-after, we sleep that duration; you should probably do the same.

HTTP Response-code ‘999’

You can look for it in the spec, but you won’t find it. Delicious likes to send a ‘999’ back when you’re hitting them too hard. Consider backing off for several minutes if you see this from them.

non-200 HTTP Response Bodies

While many services don’t bother sending response bodies back for non-200s (and those that do often don’t provide anything actionable), many do. It’s a good idea to write those bodies to a log file (or at least the first n-hundred bytes) for human inspection. There can be some useful information in there to help you build a more effective and efficient integration.

The matrix of services-to-response codes, and how you should respond to them, is big. The above is just a small slice of the scenarios your integrations will encounter, and that you’ll need to solve for.

While a service’s documentation is always some degree out of date, and you can only truly learn the behavioral characteristics through long nights of debugging, here are some pointers to service specific response codes that you might find useful.

PubSubHubbub (PuSH), Google and Buzz

Setting the quality, validity, and longevity of Google Buzz as a product aside, here’s a first reaction to its PubSubHubbub based API.

I love the pubsub model, because driving applications via events, vs. polling, is almost always advantageous, and certainly more efficient. Gnip has a chapter in O’Reilly’s Beautiful Data wherein we go deeper into why the world should be event driven rather than founded on incessant polling.. bslatkin, also has a good post on the topic (Why Polling Sucks).

Over the past few days we’ve built Google Buzz support into the Gnip offering, which has allowed me to finally dig into PuSH Subscription at the implementation level. Mike Barinek, previously with Gnip, built a Ruby PuSH hub, but I haven’t gone that deep yet.

Some PuSH Subscriber thoughts…

  • PuSH lacks support for batch topic subscription requests. This is a bummer when your customers want to subscribe to large numbers of topics, as you have to one-off each subscription request. Unfortunately, I don’t see an easy way to extend the protocol to allow for batching, as the request acknowledgment semantics are baked into the HTTP response code itself, rather than a more verbose HTTP body.
  • Simple and lightweight. As far as pubsub protocols go, PuSH is nice and neat. Good leverage, and definition, of how HTTP should be used to communicate the bare minimum. While in the bullet above I complain that I want some expandability on this front, which would pollute things a bit, the simplicity of the protocol can’t be reckoned with.
  • Google’s Hub
    • Happily accepts, and returns success for, batch topic subscription requests, when in fact all topics aren’t actually subscribed. Bug.
    • Is the most consistent app I’ve seen WRT predicable HTTP interaction patterns. Respectfully sends back 503/retry-afters when it needs to, and honors them. I wish I could say this about a dozen other HTTP interfaces I have to interact with.
    • Is fast to field subscription requests. However, the queue on the back that shuffles events through the system has proven inconsistent and flaky. I don’t think I’ve lost any data, but the latency and order in which events move through it isn’t as consistent as I’d like. In order for event driven architectures to work, this needs to be tightened up.

Here’s to event driven systems!

Migrating to the Twitter Streaming API: A Primer

Some context:

Long, long ago, in a galaxy far, far away, Twitter provided a firehose of data to a few of partners and the world was happy.  These startups were awash in real-time data and they got spoiled, some might say, by the embarrassment of riches that came through the real-time feed.  Over time, numerous factors caused Twitter to cease offering the firehose.  There was much wailing and gnashing of teeth on that day, I can tell you!

At roughly the same time, Twitter bought real-time search company Summize and began offering to everyone access to what is now known as the Search API.  Unlike Twitter’s existing REST API, which was based around usernames, the Search API enabled companies to query for recent data about a specific keyword.  Because of the nature of polling, companies had to contend with latency (the time between when someone performs an action and when an API consumer learns about it) and Twitter had to deal with a constantly-growing number of developers connected to an inherently inefficient interface.

Last year, Twitter announced that they were developing the spiritual successor to the firehose — a real-time stream that could be filtered on a per-customer basis and provide the real-time, zero latency results people wanted.  By August of last year, alpha customers had access to various components of the firehose (spritzer, the gardenhose, track, birddog, etc) and provided feedback that helped shape and solidify Twitter’s Streaming API.

A month ago Twitter Engineer John Kalucki (@jkalucki) posted on the Twitter API Announcements group that “High-Volume and Repeated Queries Should Migrate to Streaming API“.  In the post, he detailed several reasons why the move is beneficial to developers.  Two weeks later, another Twitter developer announced a new error code, 420, to let developers identify when they are getting rate limited by the Search API.  Thus, both the carrot and the stick have been laid out.

The streaming API is going to be a boon for companies who collect keyword-relevant content from the Twitter stream, but it does require some work on the part of developers.  In this post, we’ll help explain who will benefit from using Twitter’s new Streaming API and some ways to make the migration easier.

Question 1:  Do I need to make the switch?

Let me answer your question with another question — Do you have a predictable set of keywords that you habitually query?  If you don’t, keep using the Search API.  If you do, get thee to the Streaming API.

Examples:

  • Use the Streaming API any time you are tracking a keyword over time or sending notifications /  summaries to a subscriber.
  • Use the Streaming API if you need to get *all* the tweets about a specific keyword.
  • Use the Search API for visualization and search tools where a user enters a non-predictable search query for a one-time view of results.
  • What if you offer a configurable blog-based search widget? You may have gotten away with beating up the Search API so far, but I’d suggest setting up a centralized data store and using it as your first look-up location when loading content — it’s bad karma to force a data provider to act as your edge cache.

Question 2: Why should I make the switch?

  • First and foremost, you’ll get relevant tweets significantly faster.  Linearly polling an API or RSS feed for a given set of keywords automatically creates latency which increases at a linear rate.  Assuming one query per second, the average latency for 1,000 keywords is a little over eight minutes; the average latency for 100,000 keywords is almost 14 hours!  With the Streaming API, you get near-real-time (usually within one second) results, regardless of the number of keywords you track.
  • With traditional API polling, each query returns N results regardless of whether any results are new since your last request.  This puts the onus of deduping squarely on your shoulders.  This sounds like it should be simple — cache the last N resultIDs in memory and ignore anything that’s been seen before.  At scale, high-frequency keywords will consume the cache and low frequency keywords quickly age out.  This means you’ll invariably have to hit the disk and begin thrashing your database. Thankfully, Twitter has already obviated much of this in the Search API with an optional “since_id” query parameter, but plenty of folks either ignore the option or have never read the docs and end up with serious deduplication work.  With Twitter’s Streaming API, you get a stream of tweets with very little duplication.
  • You will no longer be able to get full fidelity (aka all the tweets for a given keyword) from the Search API.  Twitter is placing increased weight on relevance, which means that, among other things, the Search API’s results will no longer be chronologically ordered.  This is great news from a user-facing functionality perspective, but it also means that if you query the Search API for a given keyword every N seconds, you’re no longer guaranteed to receive the new tweets each time.
  • We all complain about the limited backwards view of Twitter’s search corpus.  On any given day, you’ll have access to somewhere between seven and 14 days worth of historical data (somewhere between one quarter to one half billion tweets), which is of limited value when trying to discover historical trends.  Additionally, for high volume keywords (think Obama or iPhone or Toyota), you may only have access to an hour of historical data, due to the limited number of results accessible through Twitter’s paging system.  While there is no direct correlation between the number of queries against a database and the amount of data that can be indexed, there IS a direct correlation between devoting resources to handle ever-growing query demands and not having resources to work on growing the index.  As persistent queries move to the Streaming API, Twitter will be able to devote more resources to growing the index of data available via the Search API (see Question 4, below).
  • Lastly, you don’t really have a choice.  While Twitter has not yet begun to heavily enforce rate limiting (Gnip’s customers currently see few errors at 3,600 queries per hour), you should expect the Search API’s performance profile to eventually align with the REST API (currently 150 queries per hour, reportedly moving to 1,500 in the near future).

Question 3: Will I have to change my API integration?

Twitter’s Streaming API uses streaming HTTP

  • With traditional HTTP requests, you initiate a connection to a web server, the server sends results and the connection is closed.  With streaming HTTP, the connection is maintained and new data gets sent over a single long-held response.  It’s not unusual to see a Streaming API connection last for two or three days before it gets reset.
  • That said, you’ll need to reset the connection every time you change keywords.  With the Streaming API , you upload the entire set of keywords when establishing a connection.  If you have a large number of keywords, it can take several minutes to upload all of them and during the duration you won’t get any streaming results.  The way to work around this is to initiate a second Streaming API connection, then terminate the original connection once the new one starts receiving data.  In order to adhere to Twitter’s request that you not initiate a connection more than once every couple of minutes, highly volatile rule sets will need to batch changes into two minute chunks.
  • You’ll need to decouple data collection from data processing.  If you fall behind in reading data from the stream, there is no way to go back and get it (barring making a request from the Search API).  The best way to ensure that you are always able to keep up with the flow of streaming data is to place incoming data into a separate process for transformation, indexing and other work.  As a bonus, decoupling enables you to more accurately measure the size of your backlog.

Streaming API consumers need to perform more filtering on their end

  • Twitter’s Streaming API only accepts single-term rules; no more complex queries.  Say goodbye to ANDs, ORs and NOTs.  This means that if you previously hit the Search API looking for “Avatar Movie -Game”, you’ve got some serious filtering to do on your end.  From now on, you’ll add to the Streaming API one or more of the required keywords (Avatar and/or Movie) and filter out from the results anything without both keywords and containing the word “Game”.
  • You may have previously relied on the query terms you sent to Twitter’s Search API to help you route the results internally, but now the onus is 100% on you.  Think of it this way: Twitter is sending you a personalized firehose based upon your one-word rules.  Twitter’s schema doesn’t include a <keyword> element, so you don’t know which of your keywords are contained in a given Tweet.  You’ll have to inspect the content of the tweet in order to route appropriately.
  • And remember, duplicates are the exception, not the rule, with the Streaming API, so if a given tweet matches multiple keywords, you’ll still only receive it once.  It’s important that you don’t terminate your filtering algo on your first keyword or filter match; test against every keyword, every time.

Throttling is performed differently

  • Twitter throttles their Search API by IP address based upon the number of queries per second.  In a world of real-time streaming results, this whole concept is moot.  Instead, throttling is defined by the number of keywords a given account can track and the overall percentage of the firehose you can receive.
  • The default access to the Streaming API is 200 keywords; just plug in your username and password and off you go.  Currently, Twitter offers approved customers access to 10,000 keywords (restricted track) and 200,000 keywords (partner track).  If you need to track more than 200,000 keywords, Twitter may bind “partner track” access to multiple accounts, giving you access to 400,000 keywords or even more.
  • In addition to keyword-based streams, Twitter makes available several specific-use streams, including the link stream (All tweets with a URL) and the retweet stream (all retweets).  There are also various levels of userid-based streams (follow, shadow and birddog) and the overall firehose (spritzer, gardenhose and firehose), but they are outside the bounds of this post.
  • The best place to begin your quest for increased Streaming API is an email to api@twitter.com — briefly describe your company and use case along with the requested access levels. (This process will likely change for coming Commercial Accounts.)
  • Twitter’s Streaming API is throttled at the overall stream level. Imagine that you’ve decided to try to get as many tweets as you can using track.  I know, I know, who would do such a thing?  Not you, certainly.  But imagine that you did — you entered 200 stop words, like “and”, “or”, “the” and “it” in order to get a ton of tweets flowing to you.  You would be sorely disappointed, because twitter enforces a secondary throttle, a percentage of firehose available to each access level.  The higher the access level (partner track vs. restricted track vs. default track), the greater the percentage you can consume.  Once you reach that amount, you will be momentarily throttled and all matching tweets will be dropped on the floor.  No soup for you!  You should monitor this by watching for “limit” notifications.  If you find yourself regularly receiving these, either tighten up your keywords are request greater access from Twitter.

Start tracking deletes

  • Twitter sends deletion notices down the pipe when a user deletes one of their own tweets.  While Twitter does not enforce adoption of this feature, please do the right thing and implement it.  When a user deletes a tweet, they want it stricken from the public record.  Remember, “it ain’t complete if you don’t delete.”  We just made that up.  Just now.  We’re pretty excited about it.

Question 4: What if I want historical data too?


Twitter’s Streaming API is forward-looking, so you’ll only get new tweets when you add a new keyword.  Depending on your use case you may need some historical data to kick things off.  If so, you’ll want to make one simultaneous query to the Search API.  This means that you’ll need to maintain two integrations with Twitter APIs (three, if you’re taking advantage of Twitter’s REST API for tracking specific users), but the benefit is historical data + low-latency / high-reliability future data.

And as described before, the general migration to the Streaming API should result in deeper results from the Search API, but even now you can get around 1,500 results for a keyword if you get acquainted with the “page” query parameter.

Questions 5: What if I need more help?

Twitter resources:

Streaming HTTP resources:

Gnip help:

  • Ask questions in the comments below and we’ll respond inline
  • Send email to eric@gnip.com to ask the Gnip team direct questions

Social Data in a Marketplace

Gnip; shipping & handling for data. Since our inception a couple of years ago, this is one of the ways we’ve described ourselves. What many folks in the social data space (publishers and consumers alike) surprisingly don’t understand however is that such a thing is necessary. Several times we’ve come up against folks who indicate that either a) “our (random publisher X) data’s already freely available through an API” or b) “I (random consumer Y) have free access to their data through their API.” While both statements are often true, they’re shortsighted.

If you’re a “web engineer” versed in HTTP and XHR with time on your hands, then accessing data from a social media publisher (e.g. Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, Digg…. etc) may be relatively straightforward. However, while API integration might be “easy” for you, keep in mind that you’re in the minority. Thousands of companies, either not financially able to afford a “web engineer” or simply technically focused elsewhere (if at all), need help accessing the data they need to make business decisions. Furthermore, while you may do your own integrations, how robust is your error reporting, monitoring, and management of your overall strategy? Odds are that you have not given those areas the attention they require. Did your stream of data stop because of a bug in your code, or because the service you were integrated with went down? Could you more efficiently receive the same data from a publisher, while relieving load from your (and the publisher’s) system? Do you have live charts that depict how data is moving through the system (not just the publisher’s side of the house)? This is where Gnip Data Collection as a Service steps in.

As the social media/data space has evolved over the past couple of years, the necessity of a managed/solution-as-a-service has become clear. As expected, the number of data consumers continues to explode, while the number of consumers with technical capability to reliably integrate with the publishers, as a ratio to total, is shrinking.

Finally some good technical/formatting standards are catching on (PubSubHubbub, WebHooks, HTTP-long-polling/streaming/Comet (thanks Twitter), ActivityStreams), which is giving everyone a vocabulary and common conceptual understanding to use when discussing how/when real-time data is produced/consumed.

In 2010 we’re going to see the beginnings of maturation in the otherwise Wild-West of social data. As things evolve I hope innovation doesn’t suffer (mass availability of data has done wonderful things), but I do look forward to giving other, less inclined, players in the marketplace access to the data they need. As a highly focused example of this kind of maturation happening before our eyes, checkout SimpleGeo. Can I do geo stuff as an engineer, yes. Do I want to collect the thousand sources of light to build what I want to build around/with geo; no. I prefer a one-stop-shop.