Gnip. The Story Behind the Name

Have you ever thought “Gnip”. . . well that is a strange name for a company, what does it mean? As one of the newest members of the Gnip team I found myself thinking that very same thing. And as I began telling my friends about this amazing new start-up that I was going to be working for in Boulder, Colorado they too began to inquire as to the meaning behind the name.

Gnip, pronounced (guh’nip), got its name from the very heart of what we do, realtime social media data collection and delivery. So let’s dive in to . . .

Data Collection 101

There are two general methods for data collection, pull technology and push technology. Pull technology is best described as a data transfer in which the request is initiated by the data consumer and responded to by the data publisher’s server. In contrast, push technology refers to the request being initiated by the data publisher’s server and sent to the data consumer.

So why does this matter . . .

Well most social media publishers use the pull method. This means that the data consumer’s system must constantly go out and “ping” the data publisher’s server asking, “do you have any new data now?” . . . “how about now?” . . . “and now?” And this can cause a few issues:

  1. Deduplication – If you ping the social media server one second and then ping it again a second later and there were no new results, you will receive the same results you got one second ago. This would then require deduplication of the data.
  2. Rate Limiting – every social media data publisher’s server out there sets different rate limits, a limit used to control the number of times you can ping a server in a given time frame. These rate limits are constantly changing and typically don’t get published. As such, if your server is set to ping the publisher’s server above the rate limit, it could potentially result in complete shut down of your data collection, leaving you to determine why the connection is broken (Is it the API . . . Is it the rate limit . . . What is the rate limit)?

So as you can see, pull technology can be a tricky beast.

Enter Gnip

Gnip sought to provide our customers with the option: to receive data in either the push model or the pull model, regardless of the native delivery from the data publisher’s server. In other words we wanted to reverse the “ping” process for our customers. Hence, we reversed the word “ping” to get the name Gnip. And there you have it, the story behind the name!